Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Strace Buffer Display

 The "strace" tool is powerful and very useful. Recently a user of our software sent us an strace output that included a packet send. Here's an excerpt:

sendmsg(88, {msg_name(16)={sa_family=AF_INET, sin_port=htons(14400), sin_addr=inet_addr("239.84.0.100")}, msg_iov(1)=[{"\2\0a\251C\27c;\0\0\2\322\0\0/\263\0\0\0\0\200\3\0\0", 24}], msg_controllen=0, msg_flags=0}, 0) = 24 <0.000076>

Obviously there's some binary bytes being displayed. I see a "\0a", so it's probably hex. But wait, there's also a \251. Does that mean 0x25 followed by ascii '1'? I decoded it assuming hex, and the packet wasn't valid.

So I did a bit of Googling. Unfortunately, I didn't note where I saw it, but somebody somewhere said that it follows the C string conventions. And C strings come from long ago, when phones had wires connecting them to wall jacks, stack overflow was a bug in a recursive program, and octal ruled the waves when it came to specifying binary data.

So \0a is 0x00 followed by ascii 'a' and \251 is 0xa9. Now the packet parses out correctly. (It's a "Session Message" if you're curious.)

So, I guess I'm a little annoyed by that choice as I would prefer hex, but I guess there's nothing all that wrong with it. Hex or octal: either way I need a calculator to convert to decimal. (And yes, I'm sure some Real Programmers can convert in their heads.)